Mariner Monday – Eliza Ann Shackford, a single woman, owned 2/64 of the Schooner Palos in 1872 (Blog 390)

While looking for information about the ships that Shackford’s sailed, we came across the book Ship registers and enrollments of Machias, Maine, 1780-1930 Vol 2 which included this description of the Schooner Palos.

ship-palos-1872-master-william-shackford-partners-william-shackford-eliza-a-shackford-ship-registers-and-enrollments-of-machias-maine-1780-1930-vol-2“PALOS, schooner, of Eastport. Official No. 20275, Sig. let.
J. G. F. B. Built at Eastport; 1868. 199.10 tone; 104.51 ft. x 27.33 ft. x
10.33 ft. One deck, two masts, square Stern, a billethead. Previously enrolled (temporary) July 23, 1872, at Baltimore, Md. Registered (temporary), No. 24, Aug. 30, 1872, at Machias. Owners; William Shackford, 2/64, Charles B. Paine, E. S. Paine; George H. Paine and William Paine, 10/64; copartner, J. H. McLarren, 8/64, A. Bradford, 4/64, Seward B. Hume; 2/64, M. Small, 4/64, E. E. Sneed, 2/64, S. Perkins, 2/64, James P. Edgar, 2/64, John Faus, 2/64, J. S. Huston, 2/64, J. W. Hinckley, 2/64, Eliza A. Shackford, 2/64, P. Houghton, 1/64, H. Piney, 1/64, James Winchester, 2/64, Eastport; John B. Wooster, 2/64; Portland; M. E. B, Winchester, 4/64, Chelsea, Mass.; John Boynton, 8/64, Jed Frye, 2/64, New York City, Master: William Shackford

This document lists Eliza Ann Shackford, a single woman as owning 2/64ths of the ship Palos in 1872.  We presume she inherited her portion of ownership from her father Jacob as she, her brother William, and her sister Matilda, wife of Charles B Paine were recipients of her father’s will .  Her father, Jacob Shackford died on June 19, 1869 and his death was shortly followed by their mother Eliza (Pearce) Shackford.

We don’t know much about Eliza Ann Shackford who born on Oct 10, 1813 in Eastport, Maine to Jacob and Eliza (Pearce) Shackford.  Her father was a seaman who lived at the corner of Water and Ney Street in Eastport, Maine, and sailed frequently to the West Indies.  We’re not sure where Eliza Ann travelled but we find her arriving in Passamaquoddy in 1842, age 28.  She was listed in the 1850 and 1860 census in her father’s home and was living on her own in J B Bordman’s hotel in 1870 listed with a real estate valued at $1000 and personal property valued at $1500.  We do not find her in the 1880 census but her death was mentioned on Feb 17 1899 in the Eastport Sentinel.  According to her death record, she died of heart failure and was buried in Eastport.  We wish we knew more about this independent women — we’ve found an index that references her probate records – perhaps we’ll learn a bit more about Eliza Ann after we find and transcribe those records.

All posts on this website are a work in progress.  We’d love to learn of any corrections or additions to the information shared.  Also we’d love it if  you’d like the post here or at http://www.facebook.com/shackfordgenealogy) as that helps share the post with others. Thanks!

SOURCES:

1850 United States Federal Census, Washington County, Maine, population schedule, Eastport, page 501 (written), dwelling 346, family 444, Jacob Shackford; digital images, FamilySearch (http://www.familysearch.org : accessed 18 December 2014).

1860 United States Federal Census, Washington County, Maine, population schedule, Eastport, Page No 29, dwelling 170, family 169, Jacob Shackford; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 December 2014).

1870 United States Federal Census, Washington County, Maine, population schedule, Eastport, Page No 43 (written) 243 (stamped), dwelling 302, family 338, J B Bordman; digital images, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 20 December 2014).

Maine State of Maine, “Maine Births and Christenings, 1739-1900,” index,” database, FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 27 October 2013), Eliza Ann Shackford b. 10 Oct 1813.

Maine, Maine Vital Records, 1670-1921, , Eliza A Shackford, d., 17 February 1899; digital images, FamilySearch (http://www.familysearch.org : accessed 27 October 2013).

Ship registers and enrollments of Machias, Maine, 1780-1930 Vol 2 (Rockland, Maine: The National Archives Project, 1942), page 685; digital images, Hathi Trust (http://babel.hathitrust.org/ : accessed 8 January 2015.

“United States Index to Passenger Arrivals, Atlantic and Gulf Ports, 1820-1874,” images, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 8 January 2015), Elis Ann Shackford

Wiley Kenneth L., editor, Vital Records from the Eastport Sentinel of Eastport, Maine 1818-1900: Note: Cover and title page of my hard copy edition are misspelled as “Eastport Sentinal” (Camden, Maine: Picton, Press, 1996), p. 589.

Copyright 2017 Joanne Shackford Parkes  (sharing a link to this post is appreciated but please do not just copy this material and paste it elsewhere)

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Treasure Chest Thursday – Court Case Connects Capt Jacob Shackford to Schooner Sarah (Blog 352)

We love finding sources that connect Shackford sea captains to the ships they sailed! The Federal Case 16,262 U. S. vs Shackford tells us that:

Capt Jacob Shackford was the master of the Schooner Sarah in about 1830. He temporarily registered the schooner which was registered in Eastport in New York and traveled from New York with passengers and cargo from New York to St Johns, New Brunswick, landed there and picked up return cargo and passengers.  On the way back to New York, Capt Jacob Shackford stopped in Eastport and anchored off the town where he waited for the tides and after consulting with the customs agents landed and added passengers.  He was fined for not delivering a temporary registration to the court of Passamaquoddy within ten days

The Jacob in this case must be Jacob Shackford (1790-1869), son of John and Esther (Woodwell) Shackford as he is the only Jacob of age to be be sailing a ship in this timeframe.

US vs Jacob Shackford Master of Sarah The Federal Cases Book 27 (St. Paul West Publishing, 1896), page 1038

U.S. v. SHACKFORD (Case No. 16262)

Case No. 16,262
(5 Mason, 445)1
Circuit Court, D. Maine May Term 18302
SHIPPING – NON-DELIVERY OF REGISTER-LIABILITY
OF MASTER.
To affect the master of a vessel with the pun-
alty provided for his non-delivery of a tempo-
ary register, granted under the 3d section of
the coasting act of 1793, c. 52 [1 Story’s Laws
280; 1 Stat. 306, c. 8), there must not only be
an arrival at the port, to which the vessel be-
longs, but it must be an arrival there, not by ac-
cident, or from necessity but intentionally, as
one of the terminal of the voyage.
[Cited in U. S. v. Helriggie, Case No. 15, 344;
Parsons v. Hunger 1d. 10, 778; Toler v.
White, 1d. 14, 079; Harrison v. Voyse, 0
How. (50. U.S) 378; The Javirena, 14 C.
C. A. 350, 67 Fed. 155.)
[Error to the district court of the United
States for the district of Maine.)
Debt for the penalty of one hundred dol-
lars, against the defendant [Jacob Shack-
ford), as master of the schooner Sarah, of
Eastport, for not delivering up a temporary
register, obtained in the district of New
York, within ten days after the arrival of the
vessel at Eastport, where she belonged, ac-
cording to the provisions of the 3d ection of
the coasting act of 1783 c. 52. The case
came before the district court upon an agreed
statement of facts, a follows: “In this case
it is agreed, that the schooner Sarah, of
which the defendant was master, belonged
to Eastport; and was there duly enrolled and
licensed; and thence she proceeded to New
York, where she took a temporary register
and sailed on a voyage to St. Johns, New
Brunswick; landed her cargo there, and took
a return cargo and passengers for New York.
On her way to the latter place, she stopped
at Eastport, in the American waters, and
within the district of Passamaquoddy, and
anchored off the town, and waited about two
hours for the tide; during which period, she
landed some passengers, and their baggage,
having permit from the custom-house for
that purpose; took on board some other pas-
sengers and small stores, and sailed under
the same temporary register to New York,
and did not deliver up her temporary regis-
ter to the collector of Passamaquoddy with-
in ten days. Upon this evidence, the cause
is submitted to the decision of the judge, re-
serving the right of appea, as from a judg-
ment rendered on verdict.”
The district court pronounced a judgment
in favour of the defendant (Case No. 16, 203).
upon which a writ of error was brought to
the circuit court.
Mr. Shepley, U. S. Dist. Atty.
Mr. Greenleaf, for defendant.
[more not transcribed]

All posts on this website are a work in progress.  We’d love to learn of any corrections or additions to the information shared.  Also we’d love it if  you’d like the post here or at http://www.facebook.com/shackfordgenealogy) as that helps share the post with others. Thanks!

SOURCES:

The Federal Cases Comprising Cases Argued and Determined in the Circuit and District Courts of the United States From the Earliest Times to the Beginning of the Federal Reporter Arramged Alphabetically by the Titles of the Cases and Numbered Consecutively Book 27 U.S. v. Morse – U.S. (Swat v.) Case No 15,820 – Case No. 16,425 (St. Paul: West Publishing, 1896), page 1038; digital images, Google Books (https://books.google.com/books : accessed 17 August 2016.

Copyright 2017 Joanne Shackford Parkes  (sharing a link to this post is appreciated but please do not just copy this material and paste it elsewhere)