Mystery Monday – Why Was Samuel Quimby Shackford Suing Ship Hermann in California in 1850? (Blog 416)

Samuel Quimby Shackford, the eighth child of Samuel and Hannah (Currier) Shackford was born in Chester, New Hampshire September 25, 1822.  When he was 19 years old, his father died and left everything to his mother Hannah and his brother Jonathan.  Samuel Q and his siblings  received $1 as a token of remembrances. Seven years later, on January 31, 1849, Samuel and two of his brothers John and Luther headed to California aboard the Steamer Corsair.

Sometime thereafter Samuel filed a lawsuit against Ship Hermann and Owners.  This is all we know about the lawsuit:

Samuel Q Shackford vs Ship Hermann DISTRICT COURT, Daily Alta California (San Francisco, California), 14 August 1850
Daily Alta California, Aug 14, 1850

DISTRICT COURT-Judge Parsons – Samuel Q Shackford vs Ship Hermann and Owners. – This was a motion to set aside writ of attachment. Motion argued and overruled.

Unfortunately Samuel died on Oct 9, 1850, 45 days after filing the lawsuit – he was only 28 years old.  Someday we hope to learn more about why Samuel sued the Ship Hermann

All posts on this website are a work in progress.  We’d love to learn of any corrections or additions to the information shared.  Also we’d love it if  you’d like the post here or at http://www.facebook.com/shackfordgenealogy) as that helps share the post with others. Thanks!

SOURCES:

Chase John Carroll, History of Chester New Hampshire Including Auburn A Supplement to the History of Old Chester Published in 1869 (Derry, New Hampshire: John Carroll Chase, 1926), page 357-358; digital image, Archive.org (https://archive.org : accessed 27 December 2016.

“DISTRICT COURT,” Daily Alta California (San Francisco, California), 14 August 1850; digital images, California Digital Newspaper Collection (https://cdnc.ucr.edu : accessed 11 March 2017).

Find A Grave, Find A Grave, digital images (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 5 April 2015), Samuel L Find A Grave Memorial# 140723334.

New Hampshire, New Hampshire, Birth Records, 1659-1900, , Samuel Quimby Shackford, 25 September 1822; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 7 July 2013); “New Hampshire, Birth Records, through 1900.” Online index and digital images. New England Historical Genealogical Society. Citing New Hampshire Bureau of Vital Records, Concord, New Hampshire.

Copyright 2017 Joanne Shackford Parkes  (sharing a link to this post is appreciated but please do not just copy this material and paste it elsewhere)

Sunday’s Obituary – Mary Elizabeth Shackford of Newmarket NH (1842-1923) (Blog 410)

We found this wonderful obituary of Mary Elizabeth Shackford in the Nov 18, 1921 edition of the Newmarket Advertiser!  Before we found the obituary all we knew of Mary Elizabeth Shackford was that she appeared in the 1850, 1860, 1870, and 1880 census records with her father William A Shackford and his family, was listed in the 1918 and 1921 Exeter directory living on Elm Street where she died on Nov 8, 1921.

obituary-mary-elizabeth-shackford-in-memoriam-newmarket-advertiser-18-november-1921-digitalimages-lee-public-libraryThe passing of Miss Mary Eliza-
beth Shackford on Nov. 8th, in her
eightieth year takes from the com-
munity the last member of a family
that has been identified with the life
of the town for nearly a hundred and
twenty years. John Shackford came
from Newington to the Bayside just
at the opening of the nineteenth
century, and for two generations his
family lived on the farm at Shack-
ford’s Point. Seth R. Shackford,
son of John, built the large house still
standing on Shackford’s Hill, and his
eldest son, William Adams Shackford,
established the home opposite his
father’s dying there in 1885.
Mary was the youngest child of
William Adams Shackford and his wife,
Antoinette Catherine (Laurent), who
was born in France and emigrated, as
a child, with her family, who feld dur-
ing the terrors of the Napoleonic
wars, lived quite alone in the old
house on the hill since the death of
her mother in 1896. She was a
woman of unusual mental endowment,
with keen wit and a gift of mimicry
that made her an always entertaining
companion. She loved little child-
ren and was loved by them. Many,
now fathers and mothers themselves,
remember charming hours of child-
hood spent in her company, when she
arranged delightful pastimes for their
amusement.
The last months were full of weak-
ness and suffering and the end came
as a happy release. She was laid to
rest with her kindred in Riverside
cemetery, after a simple service, on
Friday afternoon.

We have to thank the Lee Public Library (in Lee, NH) for digitizing it’s newspapers as it is allowing us to learn more about the Shackford family from our home in Arizona!!!  You can find the link to the Newmarket Advertiser here.  Also we want to thank  Kenneth Marks for his blog The Ancestor Hunt which describes updates in digital newspapers.  It was because of his February 3, 2017 blog about the Advantage Preservation Hosting 292 Free Newspaper Collections that we discovered these newspapers now available from the Lee library!

All posts on this website are a work in progress.  We’d love to learn of any corrections or additions to the information shared.  Also we’d love it if  you’d like the post here or at http://www.facebook.com/shackfordgenealogy) as that helps share the post with others. Thanks!

SOURCES:

1850 United States Federal Census, Rockingham, New Hampshire, population schedule, Newmarket, page 315 (penned), 158 (stamped), dwelling 671, family 743, Wm Shackford; digital images, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed ).

1860 United States Federal Census, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, population schedule, Newmarket, Page No 8, dwelling 41, family 52, William A Shackford; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://ancestry.com : accessed 16 February 2014).

1870 United States Federal Census, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, population schedule, New Market, Page No. 24, dwelling 127, family 188, William A Shackford; digital images, FamilySearch (http://www.familysearch.org : accessed 16 February 2014).

1880 United States Federal Census, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, population schedule, Newmarket, enumeration district (ED) Enumeration District No 218, Page no 441, dwelling 338, family 472, William Shackford; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 February 2014).

“IN MEMORIAM,” Newmarket Advertiser, 18 November 1921; digitalimages, Lee Public Library (http://lee.advantage-preservation.com : accessed 12 February 2017).

New Hampshire, New Hampshire, Death Records 1654-1947, , Mary E Shackford, 8 November 1921; digital images, FamilySearch, New Hampshire Death Records, 1654-1947 (http://www.familysearch.org : accessed 16 February 2014).

Copyright 2017 Joanne Shackford Parkes  (sharing a link to this post is appreciated but please do not just copy this material and paste it elsewhere)

Military Monday – Theodore Shackford, (1773-1809) signed the 1776 Association Test (Blog 395)

In April 1776 the Colony of New Hampshire Committee of Safety required all men over the age of twenty-one to pledge their allegiance and sign a document called the Association Test stating that they supported the cause of independence.  Each town submitted a list of signatures and a list of those who refused to sign and sent the lists to the Committee of Safety for the State of New Hampshire.

In 1881, the State of New Hampshire began hiring historians to publish important portions of documents pertaining to the American Revolution and share them with each city and town in the state, the public libraries, and the New Hampshire Historical Society. Fortunately today this allows us to search these documents for the word Shackford and from the State Papers published in 1910, we see that two Shackfords in the city of Chester, New Hampshire, signed the Association Test – Theodore Shackford who would have been 43 years old and his John Shackford, Jr  who we believe is his brother.  Their father, John was still living but resided in Andover, Massachusetts.

Theodore’s two daughters Sarah and Susannah had married David Richardson and Nathan Knowles respectively, both of whom had also signed the document.

theodore-shackford-association-batchellor-albert-stillman-itt-d-editor-of-state-papers-miscellaneous-revolutionary-documents-of-new-hampshire-including-the-association-test-vol-30-state-papeASSOCIATION TEST
COLONY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE
IN COMMITTEE OF SAFETY
April 12th, 1776
In Order to carry the underwritten RESOLVE of the Hon’ble Continental CONGRESS into Execution, You are requested to desire all Males above Twenty One Years of Age (Lunaticks, Idiots,
and Negroes excepted) to sign the DECLARATION on this
Paper; and when so done, to make Return hereof, together with the Name or Names of all who shall refuse to sign the same, to the GENERAL-ASSEMBLY, or Committee of Safety of this Colony.
M. Weare, Chairman.
In CONGRESS, March 14th, 1776
Resolve, That it be recommended to the several Assemblies,
Conventions, and Councils, or Committees of Safety of the United
Colonies, and Councils, or Committees of Safety of the United
Colonies, immediately to cause all Persons to be disarmed within
their Respective Colonies, who are notoriously disaffected to the
Cause of AMERICA, Or who have not associated, and refuse to
associate, to defend by ARMS, the United Colonies, against the
Hostile Attempts of the British Fleets and Armies.
(COPY) Extract from the Minutes.
Charles Thompson, Sec’ry.
In Consequence of the above Resolution, of the Hon. Continental
CONGRESS, and to show our Determination in joining our Amer-
ican Brethern, in defending the Lives, Liberties, and Properties of
the Inhabitants of the UNITED COLONIES.
WE, the Subscribers, do hereby solemnly engage, and promise,
that we will, to the utmost of our Power, at the Risque of our
Lives and Fortunes, with ARMS, oppose the Hostile Proceedings
of the British Fleets, and Armies, against the United American
COLONIES.

CHESTER

David Richardson [husband of Theodore’s daughter Sarah]

Nathan knowles [husband of Theodore’s daughter Susannah]

John Shackford jnr [probably Theodore’s brother, 1735-1779]
Theodr Shackford [1773-1809]
Moses Richardson [David Richardson’s father]

All posts on this website are a work in progress.  We’d love to learn of any corrections or additions to the information shared here as we are hoping to learn more of these Shackford families.  Also – if you liked this blog, please like the post here or at http://www.facebook.com/shackfordgenealogy) as that helps share the post with others. Thanks!

SOURCES:

Batchellor Albert Stillman, Litt. D., Editor of State Papers, Miscellaneous Revolutionary Documents of New Hampshire Including the Association Test, the Pension Rolls, and Other Important Papers Vol. 30 State Papers Series (Manchester, N. H.: The John B. Clarke Co, 1910), page 1, 2, 28; digital images, Google Book (https://books.google.com : accessed 18 December 2016.

Copyright 2017 Joanne Shackford Parkes  (sharing a link to this post is appreciated but please do not just copy this material and paste it elsewhere)

Mariner Monday – John L Shackford, Mariner, Leaves Family, Settles in St Thomas and May Have Remarried There (Blog 393)

John L Shackford, the son of John and Elizabeth (Batson) Shackford was born on April 20, 1819 in Eastport, Maine.  In Dec 1838 he married Elizabeth S Clark, the daughter of John and Abigail (Batson) Shackford.  John followed the occupation of his father and siblings, that of mariner and in 1847 we find him advertising freight and passage aboard the Brig Carryl which was traveling for St Marks & Newport, from Pennsylvania to the Isle of Lobos, and to Havana.  He also was reported as rescuing members of the crew of the Bark Cambria and bringing them back to New York.

In 1850 we find John listed in the Eastport census living with his parents, his wife Elizabeth, and three children Joshua C, Abby and Esther and in 1860 we find the family in Eastport living with Esther’s parents, John and Abagail Clark with children Esther and Jenny (Regina).

Sometime thereafter the family moved to New York as we find John living in Brooklyn at 111 Adelphi.  In 1863 John’s name is listed on the Brooklyn, New York civil war draft registration and in 1864 he is listed in Brooklyn living at Hamilton north of Fulton avenue.

Shortly before February 1871, John’s wife Elizabeth traveled to Eastport, Maine where she filed for divorce, dower and alimony asking for all right title & interest in any and all real estate John had in the County of Washington, Maine.

divorce-record-elizabeth-s-shackford-and-john-l-shackford-image-285-use-this-one                             State of Maine
To the Honorable the Justices of the Supreme Judicial Court next to be Holden at Calais, within and for the County of Washington in said state on the fourth Tuesday of April A D 1871

Elizabeth S. Shackford of Eastport in said County, respectfully represents that she was married to John L.Shackford now of St Thomas, at Eastport in said County on the tenth day of December A D 1838 and had by him two children now living to wit; Joshua C Shackford & Regina T Shackford. That after her said marriage she cohabits with said Shackford in said State of Maine, and always conducted herself as a true and faithful wife.

That the said John L Shackford unmindful of his marriage vows and covenants, and the duty affection and respect he owed her, deserted her more than three years ago, and has not supported her for the last three years.
That he has been living with another woman to your Libelland Unknown in St Thomas.
That he has been married to

divorce-record-elizabeth-s-shackford-and-john-l-shackford-image-286said woman as he has declared in letters to others.
That he has a daughter by said woman and committed adultery with said woman.  Wherefore because a divorce from her said bonds of matrimony would be reasonable and proper, conducive to domestic harmony and consistent with the peace and morality of society she humbly prays your Honors such divorce accordingly – that your Honors will decree and give to her Dower and Alimonies and make such other decree as may be necessary in the exercise of a sound discretion Eastport February 13, 1871. Elizabeth S Shackford

Additional documents lists John L Shackford’s estate value at either five thousand dollars (the number is crossed out and rewritten).  The court ordered payment to Elizabeth and ensured that the United States Consul to St Thomas delivered a copy of the document to John L Shackford (misspelled Schackford on the document).  The court then allowed Elizabeth to sell land to include property at the corner of Water and Key Street (formerly Greenwich Street), land on the northerly side of Shackford’s Cove, along with other property valued at $1471.02.  We’ll transcribe more of Elizabeth’s divorce paperwork in the future.

It must have been very difficult for Elizabeth to make this statement about her husband’s relationships to the court – we think she may have had some support from her husband’s family as her brother in law, Benjamin B Batson did not complete the administration of her father in law’s estate until after  John L Shackford’s death -perhaps they knew he was ill.  John died in St Thomas on Dec 20th 1871.  This enabled Elizabeth to receive some of the land that was to have gone to her husband.

Children

(with Elizabeth S Clark)

Joshua C Shackford (1840-1917) – served in the Navy, married Sadie Bartlett

Abby M Shackford (1843-1850) – died in Cuba age 7

Esther E Shackford (1843-1865) – died age 21 in Brooklyn

Fanny S Shackford (1845-1845)

Regina L Shackford (1851-????) – also went by Jenny, last record of is found in Brooklyn in 1875

(with unknown person in St Thomas)

Daughter???  (before 1871) – mentioned in Elizabeth’s divorce records — St Thomas was under Danish rule at this time and we’re hoping some record can be found of John in the 1870 St Thomas census records — perhaps this child is listed in the 1880 census.

All posts on this website are a work in progress.  We’d love to learn of any corrections or additions to the information shared.  Also we’d love it if  you’d like the post here or at http://www.facebook.com/shackfordgenealogy) as that helps share the post with others. Thanks!

All posts on this website are a work in progress.  We’d love to learn of any corrections or additions to the information shared.  Also we’d love it if  you’d like the post here or at http://www.facebook.com/shackfordgenealogy) as that helps share the post with others. Thanks!

SOURCES:

1850 US Federal Census, Washington County, Maine, population schedule, Eastport, page 48? (penned), 244 (stamped), dwelling 272, family 360, John Shackford https: familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M6V8-HRV; digital images, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 23 December 2013).

1860 United States Federal Census, Washington County, Maine, population schedule, Eastport, Page No 72, dwelling 430, family 535, John Clark; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 28 June 2014).

“DISASTERS,” Boston Post (Boston, Massachusetts), 29 April 1847; digital images, Access Newspaper Archive (http://access.newspaperarchive.com : accessed 22 September 2015).

“FOR St. MARKS & NEWPORT, DIRECT,” Morning Courier and New York Enquirer (New York, New York), ; digital images, Fulton History (http://fultonhistory.com/ : accessed 9 September 2015).

Lain J., compiler, The Brooklyn City Directory for the Year Ending May 1st, 1862 (New York: J. Lain and Company, 1862), page 393; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 28 June 2014.

Lain J., compiler, The Brooklyn City Directory for the Year Ending May 1st, 1864 (New York: J. Lain and Company, 1864), page 417; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 September 2015.

Maine “Maine Marriages, 1771-1907,” database index, FamilySearch (http://www.familysearch.org : accessed 26 November 2014), John L Shackford m Elizabeth S Clark.

Maine State of Maine, “Maine Births and Christenings, 1739-1900,” index,” database, FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 29 August 2013), John L Shackford b. 20 Apr 1819

Maine, Maine, State Archives Collections, 1718-1917, >Maine, Washington County>Court Records>Court of Common Pleas case files no 240-429 1871 Oct>Image 282-301, Elizabeth S Shackford vs John L Shackford 22-305, ; digital images, FamilySearch (http://www.familysearch.org : accessed 11 September 2015).

“MARINE JOURNAL. Arrived,” New York Tribune (New York, New York), 29 November 1847; digital images, Fulton History (http://fultonhistory.org : accessed 25 June 2014).

“MARINE JOURNAL. PORT OF NEW YORK,” New York Tribune (New York, New York), about March 1847; digital images, Fulton History (http://fultonhistory.org : accessed 25 June 2014).

Names of persons, enrolled as liable to military duty (under the act of Congress, approved March 3, 1863,) in the Third congressional district, New York. Eleventh ward (New York: Provost Marshal General’s Bureau. Board of Enrollment (New York, 3d district), 1863), page 124; digital images, My Heritage Library Edition (http://myheritagelibraryedition.com : accessed 28 January 2015

Nobel Thomas H. House of Representatives, : LETTER From the THIRD AUDITOR OF THE TREASURY (14 December 1847), page 33; digital images, HathiTrust (http://babel.hathitrust.org/ : accessed 21 September 2015.

“Virgin Islands US, Church Records, 1765-2010,” digital image, Ancestry.com (Ancestry.co.Uk : accessed 14 September 2015), Image 112, Capt John L Shackford.

Wiley Kenneth L., editor, Vital Records from the Eastport Sentinel of Eastport, Maine 1818-1900: Note: Cover and title page of my hard copy edition are misspelled as “Eastport Sentinal” (Camden, Maine: Picton, Press, 1996), page 260.

Copyright 2017 Joanne Shackford Parkes  (sharing a link to this post is appreciated but please do not just copy this material and paste it elsewhere)

Treasure Chest Thursday – Court Case Connects Capt Jacob Shackford to Schooner Sarah (Blog 352)

We love finding sources that connect Shackford sea captains to the ships they sailed! The Federal Case 16,262 U. S. vs Shackford tells us that:

Capt Jacob Shackford was the master of the Schooner Sarah in about 1830. He temporarily registered the schooner which was registered in Eastport in New York and traveled from New York with passengers and cargo from New York to St Johns, New Brunswick, landed there and picked up return cargo and passengers.  On the way back to New York, Capt Jacob Shackford stopped in Eastport and anchored off the town where he waited for the tides and after consulting with the customs agents landed and added passengers.  He was fined for not delivering a temporary registration to the court of Passamaquoddy within ten days

The Jacob in this case must be Jacob Shackford (1790-1869), son of John and Esther (Woodwell) Shackford as he is the only Jacob of age to be be sailing a ship in this timeframe.

US vs Jacob Shackford Master of Sarah The Federal Cases Book 27 (St. Paul West Publishing, 1896), page 1038

U.S. v. SHACKFORD (Case No. 16262)

Case No. 16,262
(5 Mason, 445)1
Circuit Court, D. Maine May Term 18302
SHIPPING – NON-DELIVERY OF REGISTER-LIABILITY
OF MASTER.
To affect the master of a vessel with the pun-
alty provided for his non-delivery of a tempo-
ary register, granted under the 3d section of
the coasting act of 1793, c. 52 [1 Story’s Laws
280; 1 Stat. 306, c. 8), there must not only be
an arrival at the port, to which the vessel be-
longs, but it must be an arrival there, not by ac-
cident, or from necessity but intentionally, as
one of the terminal of the voyage.
[Cited in U. S. v. Helriggie, Case No. 15, 344;
Parsons v. Hunger 1d. 10, 778; Toler v.
White, 1d. 14, 079; Harrison v. Voyse, 0
How. (50. U.S) 378; The Javirena, 14 C.
C. A. 350, 67 Fed. 155.)
[Error to the district court of the United
States for the district of Maine.)
Debt for the penalty of one hundred dol-
lars, against the defendant [Jacob Shack-
ford), as master of the schooner Sarah, of
Eastport, for not delivering up a temporary
register, obtained in the district of New
York, within ten days after the arrival of the
vessel at Eastport, where she belonged, ac-
cording to the provisions of the 3d ection of
the coasting act of 1783 c. 52. The case
came before the district court upon an agreed
statement of facts, a follows: “In this case
it is agreed, that the schooner Sarah, of
which the defendant was master, belonged
to Eastport; and was there duly enrolled and
licensed; and thence she proceeded to New
York, where she took a temporary register
and sailed on a voyage to St. Johns, New
Brunswick; landed her cargo there, and took
a return cargo and passengers for New York.
On her way to the latter place, she stopped
at Eastport, in the American waters, and
within the district of Passamaquoddy, and
anchored off the town, and waited about two
hours for the tide; during which period, she
landed some passengers, and their baggage,
having permit from the custom-house for
that purpose; took on board some other pas-
sengers and small stores, and sailed under
the same temporary register to New York,
and did not deliver up her temporary regis-
ter to the collector of Passamaquoddy with-
in ten days. Upon this evidence, the cause
is submitted to the decision of the judge, re-
serving the right of appea, as from a judg-
ment rendered on verdict.”
The district court pronounced a judgment
in favour of the defendant (Case No. 16, 203).
upon which a writ of error was brought to
the circuit court.
Mr. Shepley, U. S. Dist. Atty.
Mr. Greenleaf, for defendant.
[more not transcribed]

All posts on this website are a work in progress.  We’d love to learn of any corrections or additions to the information shared.  Also we’d love it if  you’d like the post here or at http://www.facebook.com/shackfordgenealogy) as that helps share the post with others. Thanks!

SOURCES:

The Federal Cases Comprising Cases Argued and Determined in the Circuit and District Courts of the United States From the Earliest Times to the Beginning of the Federal Reporter Arramged Alphabetically by the Titles of the Cases and Numbered Consecutively Book 27 U.S. v. Morse – U.S. (Swat v.) Case No 15,820 – Case No. 16,425 (St. Paul: West Publishing, 1896), page 1038; digital images, Google Books (https://books.google.com/books : accessed 17 August 2016.

Copyright 2017 Joanne Shackford Parkes  (sharing a link to this post is appreciated but please do not just copy this material and paste it elsewhere)

Tombstone Tuesday – Finding John Shackford’s Gravestone in Eastport (Blog 350)

Eastport Cemetery DeerWe arrived in Eastport, Maine in the early afternoon and went to the Hillside Cemetery to see the Shackford gravestones starting with John Shackford, one of the first settlers of Eastport and an American Revolution veteran. Even though the cemetery was huge, we thought we’d find the Shackford gravestones by just walking up and down the many aisles but only found these cute little fawns.  But while taking pictures of the fawns we looked up and discovered the gravestone of John’s son, William, his first wife, and her children who died young.  John’s gravestone remained elusive.

So the next afternoon we headed over to the Eastport City Clerk’s office which we knew was responsible for the cemetery.  The city employees were most helpful and pulled the cemetery cards for John and other Shackford’s and a map.  We try to not carry paper in our small RV so they allowed us to take pictures of the documents.Map Eastport Cemetery

Cemetery Card John Shackford Eastport City Clerk

With the map, the section number, and the lot number, we were able to quickly find John’s gravestone.  The photo of John’s gravestone looks a bit awkward because the tombstone is tipped forward quite a bit instead of standing upright.

John Shackford Gravestone Eastport Hillside Cemetery
Gravestone John Shackford, Revolutionary War Veteran

 

 

 

 

Sunday’s Obituary – John Shackford (1753/5 – 1840) – Soldier of the American Revolution (Blog 348)

John Shackford, the son of Samuel and Mary (Coombs) Shackford (Samuel and Mary are my ancestors!), was born in either 1753 or 1755 in Newbury, Massachusetts.  According to George Thomas Little, he was brought up a sailor.  He enlisted in Newburyport in Capt Ezra Lunt’s Co in Col Moses Little’s Regiment on July 17, 1775.  His service card includes the word “Quebeck”   He also gave a deposition in 1779 that he was aboard the Sloop Hannah with Capt Evans and was taken prisoner with him by the Brig Hazzard from Glascow.  He also was apparently a prisoner for nine months, serving multiple weeks in irons.

John married Esther Woodwell in Newburport on November 16, 1780 and around 1784 moved to Eastport, Maine where according to Kilby, “he and five other person’s compromised the whole population of the island.” Around 1787 he brought his wife and three children to Eastport where the family settled and added more children to the family and according to Kilby were one of the 22-24 families that lived there on the lot between Shackford’s Cove and Key Street.  He’s listed in the 1790 census in Machias, and in the 1800, 1810, 1820, and 1840 censuses in Eastport.

Samuel Shackford of Chicago, an avid genealogist in his latter years and a descendant of John provided a chapter to the 1888 Kilby book titled Captain John Shackford and Family. which provides and excellent biography of John describing his skills taking and curing fish, building multiple facilities, master of the ships the “Industry” “Delight”, “Hannah”, “Sally”, and “Patty”, running a store, building a windmill, leading a militia, and serving in the military again in the War of 1812.

In 1832, John wrote his will mentioning wife Elsie (Eliza Haddon, his 2nd wife), his grandson Samuel (the Samuel mentioned above), sons John, William, and Jacob and daughters Hannah Pearce, Esther Hinkley, and Sarah S Lincoln.  He died on December 25, 1840.  We suspect many obituaries were written but at this time have only found this one from the New York Spectator.  We hope that one of his descendants preserved the discharge papers discharge mentioned in the obituary he so cherished!

Obituary John Shackford DIED, New York Spectator (New York, NY), 9 January 1841DIED,

At Eastport, Maine, Capt. John Shackford, 86. He was a soldier of the revolution, -accompanied Arnold in his expedition to Quebec, and having been of Montgomery party in the assault on that city was taken prisoner. It was his fortune, after the peace, to aid in stowing a ship at Campobello, for his old commander, who, after his treason resided some time at St. John as a merchant. His discharge from the Army bore the signature of Washington and he treasured it as a precious relic.

Note:  We’re hoping to learn more about John and his descendants when we get to Eastport in a few weeks!!!

All posts on this website are a work in progress.  We’d love to learn of any corrections or additions to the information shared.  Also we’d love it if  you’d like the post here or at http://www.facebook.com/shackfordgenealogy) as that helps share the post with others. Thanks!

SOURCES:

“DIED,” New York Spectator (New York, NY), 9 January 1841; digital images, Godfrey (http://godfrey.org : accessed 20 August 2013).

Kilby William Henry, Eastport and Passamaquoddy: A Collection of Historical and Background Sketches (Eastport, Maine: Edward E Shead & Company, 1888), page 139; digital images,, Chapter, XIV. CAPTAIN JOHN SHACKFORD AND FAMILY. By Samuel Shackford, of Chicago, Ill., Google eBooks (http://books.google.com : accessed 31 October 2013

Little George Thomas, Rev Henry S. Burrage, and Albert Roscoe Stubbs, Genealogical and Family History of the State of Maine Volume II (New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1909), page 837-838; digital images, Google Books (http://books.google.com/ : accessed 2 March 2014.

“Massachusetts Marriages, 1695-1910,” index, FamilySearch (http://www.familysearch.org : accessed 30 October 2013), John Shackford m Esther Woodwell 26 Nov 1780

“Massachusetts, Revolutionary War, Index Cards to Muster Rolls, 1775-1783,” digital images, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 1 December 2015), John Shackford; https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2548057; Selden, Jesse – Shaw, David, Image 1619.

Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolutionary War. 1906: A Compliation from the Archives, Prepared and Published by the Secretary of the Commonwealth (Boston: Wright & Potter Printing Company, 1906), page 2; digital images, Google Books (http://books.google.com : accessed 5 May 2014.

Rolls of the Soldiers in the Revolutionary War, New Hampshire, Volume 4 (n.d.), page 340; digital image, MyHeritage (http://myheritage.com : accessed 23 May 2014.

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