Samuel Shackford (1761-1844) of Wells, Maine, Revolutionary War Pensioner (Blog 475)

Samuel Shackford, the son of Paul and Eunice (Day) Shackford was born on July 24, 1761 in Wells, Maine.  He was only 18 on June 6, 1780 when he served for eight months with the men mustered by Nathaniel Wells to defend the eastern part of Massachusetts. After the completion of his enlistment, he returned to Wells where he married Sarah Whittum on March 4, 1784.  He later moved to Sanford, Maine where he worked as a farmer.  Samuel remained in Sanford where he married Eunice Day on November 15, 1787 and Charity Cousins on November 18, 1805.

In response to the Revolutionary War Act of June 7, 1832, Samuel gave the following testimony documenting his service:

Samuel Shackford Page_4_Revolutionary_War_Pension_and_BountyLand_Warrant_Application_Files

Maine District of
Special District Court of the U States
Kennebunk August 7 1832

On this seventh day of August aforesaid personally appeared
in open Court before the District Judge

Samuel Shackford a resident of Sanford in the
county of York, and state of Maine aged seventy one
years, who being first duly sworn according to law doth
on his oath make the following declaration in order
to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed-
June 7th 1832.
That he served as herein stated.
I enlisted at Wells (now Kennebunk) in the state
Maine, in April 1780 in Capt Daniel Clarks company
for the term of eight months – we marched to Portland
in the same state, where we were principally employed
in erecting works of defense during the full period of
my enlistment or until some time in December of
that year, when we were dismissed and returned home
There were five companies in the corps to which I
belonged and were commanded by Col Prime of York –
Nathan Lord of Berwick, I think was Adjutant, and
Gen Wardsmoth commanded at Portland during said
time. I was born in Wells in the year 1761 and have
resided now about forty years in Sanford, in this state
adjoining to Wells. I enlisted and served voluntarily
as above stated. I have no other record of my age except
that which my father kept in the great Bible I now have.
All my neighbors can state my general character for that
Mr David Day resides near me, and also Mr Samuel Cole
and Mr David Clark, and others who are respectable.

He hereby relinquishes every claim to a pension or annuity
except the present, and declares that his name is note on the
pension role of the agency of any state Samuel Shackford (signed)
sworn to and subscribed this day and your aforesaid.
Before
Arthur Wise U.S. Judge for the
District of Maine
Know the said Court do hereby declare their opinion that
the above named applicant was a revolutionary soldier and
served in the states.

Samuel’s testimony did not mention the name of his father but does refer to his father’s Bible which he now has in his possession.  We assume it’s the same Bible which was referred to as “Bible per Granville Shackford” (his grandson) in Samuel Burnham Shackford’s Shackford Genealogy manuscript which is the only source we’ve found for Samuel’s parents, Samuel’s birth date, and a list of his children.  Hoping the Bible is saved somewhere or at least a transcription of those pages are within the Samuel Collection. (There were boxes and boxes of material and I only had 6 hours to review the materials — hoping to be back someday.)

Samuel is listed in the 1840 census as a pensioner and received his final pension payment in the third quarter of 1844.  He died on 9 Sept 1844 and is buried on Mouse Lane in Sanford, Maine. In 2009 I corresponded with a wonderful gentleman who described how to find the gravestone, shared that Samuel’s gravestone was worn and damaged to the point that it was unreadable but he was making sure a flag was placed on Samuel’s grave.

CHILDREN:

Andrew Shackford  (1795-1858) – married his cousin Hannah Shackford

Sarah Shackford (1789-????)

Robert Shackford  (1793-????)

Eunice Shackford (1806-1822)

Christopher Shackford (1809-1870) – married Mehitable Maddox and Louisa Hill

Susan Shackford (1811-1883) – married John Thompson

Bethia Shackford (1813-1815)

Lusanna Shackford (1821-1870) – married Freeman Goodwin

[Samuel is my first cousin six times removed with a shared relative Joshua Shackford and Elizabeth Barnes]

All posts on this website are a work in progress.  We’d love to learn of any corrections or additions to the information shared.  Also we’d love it if  you’d like the post here or at http://www.facebook.com/shackfordgenealogy) as that helps share the post with others. Thanks!

SOURCES:

Emery Edwin, William Morell Emery, The History of Sanford, Maine. 1661-1900.(Fall River, Mass: William Morell Emery, 1901), page 83; digital images, Google eBook(http://www.books.google : accessed 21 October 2013.

“Index to Final Pension Payment Vouchers, compiled 1818 – 1864,” digital images, Fold3(https://www.fold3.com : accessed 8 July 2017), Samuel Shackford

Maine Society Sons of the American Revolution MESSAR(http://www.messar.org/patriots.html : accessed 5 January 2014), .

“Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files,” digital images, Fold3(http://www.fold3.com : accessed 2 July 2018), Samuel Shackford.

Secretary of the Commonwealth, Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolutionary War. A Compilation From the Archives(Boston: Wright & Potter Printing Co, 1906), page 2; digital images, Mocavo(www.mocavo.com : accessed 15 February 2014.

“Shackford Genealogy Manuscript,” 13 October 1925; typed manuscript, SG SHA 5; Shackford collection. [manuscript] by Samuel Burnham Shackford, Shackford collection. [manuscript] SG SHA 5; New England Historical and Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts.

Copyright 2018 Joanne Shackford Parkes  (sharing a link to this post is appreciated but please do not copy this material and paste it elsewhere)

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Military Monday – 2 Lt David Shackford’s Funeral (Blog 363)

David Shackford, the son of Susanna Shackford was born Aug 15, 1826 in Newburyport, Massachusetts.  His marriage to Lydia Eva Short was announced on Aug 10, 1849 and they were married on September 14, 1849.  David worked as a mariner, cordwainer (shoemaker), and fireman living at 20 Franklin Street and 34 Marlborough Streets in Newburyport.

On April 15, 1861 he joined the Massachusetts 8th Regiment, Company A also known as the Minute Men or Cushing Guards and served with his regiment from Annapolis to Washington, in Baltimore, and along the Ohio railroad.  On August 21, 1862 was elected 2nd Lieutenant by his regiment.  Unfortunately the next day he drowned in a boating accident near Plum Island Point leaving a wife, four children (Sarah J, 12; Emily C, 7; Charles H, 5; and Mary Ann, 2), and an invalid mother who was living in the local Almshouse.  On September 9, 1862 this patriotic description of his funeral was published in the Newburyport Herald:

Lieut. David Shackfod was buried on Friday, The Newburyport Herald (Newburyport, Massachusetts), 9 September 1862, page 2, col 3 pt 1
Newburyport Herald, 9 Sept 1862

Lieut. David Shackford was buried on Friday forenoon, in the Oldtown grave-yard. The principal services were at the church in Purchase street, and
performed by the pastor, Rev Mr. Butler. The church was full, the ladies occupying the side or wall pews, and the military, engine men and others with whom the deceased was associate, the body pews Music, the reading of the Scriptures, an address, a prayer and a closing benediction comprised the exercises, Mr. Butler’s remarks were extemporaneous but well adapted to the sad occasion, and calculated to benefit the listener. While he forgot not the virtues of the dead he was anxious to give such counsel to the living, as should make the wiser and better here, and to point them in the reward of those who fight “the good fight of faith,” in the future world.
There was much in the soldier worthy of admiration, and never since the country sprang into being had the people come to such an appreciation of his services. The existences of the country appealed to him and he responded and was all his heart, and when he had fallen, whether on the battlefield or in quietly passing the course which Providence had marked out for him-even while in quest or pleasure-it was well, and it would be the privilege of his friends and associate to honor his memory and emulate his spirit of self-
sacrifice and devotion to the common welfare The deceased had but learned the dangers of the nation, and he had sprung to his feet and moved onward to
the scene of peril. God had been his shield and he had returned to the bosom of his family. Again there had been the cry-“Come and help us,” and again
he had turned away from his wife and children and all that makes home dear to husband and father, and given himself to the defence of the government and the principles on which only it can rest. It had so happened that with thousands of others, he had once more and quickly, found himself among those dearest to
him on earth. And now, still again, there was a demand made for those who were willing to give themselves to their country, and his answer was, “I am
ready,” and in a few days he would have been among such as are to-day facing the enemy, or preparing for any services to which they may be called.
He had been cut down just at the moment when his fellow soldiers had assigned him an important post, and under circumstances which would be flattering to
the honest pride of any patriot. It is not for us to ask why, or to murmur. A cloud rested upon the dispensation, but no power the deceased could control could
dissipate its darkness, or scatter the deep gloom. He had met the claims upon him as a soldier, and it was enough. His promptness, courage and resolution were worth of imitation; and his safe return, after encountering the perils of a soldier’s life for months in succession, showed that heaven had smiled on his decision and his labors.
The remains were followed to the grave by the Cushing Guard, Capt. Stone’s company, and many of the members of the Fire Department. Engine Company
8, of which the deceased was a member, appeared in full ranks, wearing a badge of crape on the left arm. – on arriving at the grave the pall-bearers formed into
line on the left of the bier, when the mourning company passed up and countermarched, caving the ground. A few days since when the procession encircled the coffin, it was that they might once more gaze upon the features of the dead. Now, the lid was closed, and closed for all time, but affection had not forgot her office, and amid a profusion of flowers, and covering a portion of that motto, E Plurbus Unum, which to the American heart should be second only to Holy Writ, lay photographs of the departed-the citizen and the soldier-as if she would constrain even the grave to intensify her hallowed sins, and enforce lessons of patriotism.

While we manifest our respect for the memory of the dead, let the wants of the living be recorded The subject of these hasty thoughts leaves a wife and four
children The children are young and helpless, and the mother is an invalid. Need more be said to secure what may be necessary for their future comfort. We
learn with pleasure that the Cushing Guard have already enclosed to Mrs Shackford the sum of $25, and Neptune Engine Co No 8, $20-the amount in their treasure, and that each company contemplates another effort. The former will shortly make up a sum equal to two dollars for each member, and with what
will be done by friends who propose to call up on such as are able to contribute, we trust the hearts of the widow and fatherless will yet be made glad

All posts on this website are a work in progress.  We’d love to learn of any corrections or additions to the information shared.  Also we’d love it if  you’d like the post here or at http://www.facebook.com/shackfordgenealogy) as that helps share the post with others. Thanks!

SOURCES:

1850 United States Federal Census, Essex County, Massachusetts, population schedule, Newburyport, no page number, previous page stamped 352, penned 703, dwelling 107, family 158, David Shackford in household of Henry Lunt; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 August 2016).

1855 Massachusetts State Census, Essex County, population schedule, Newburyport, page 278, dwelling 26, family 440, David Shackford; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://ancestry.com : accessed 27 August 2016).

1860 United States Federal Census, Essex County, Massachusetts, population schedule, Newburyport, Page No 62, Susan Shackford; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://ancestry.com : accessed 4 September 2015).

“DROWNED,” The Newburyport Herald (Newburyport, Massachusetts), 26 August 1862, page 2, col 2; digital images, Newburyport Public Library (http://newburyport.advantage-preservation.com/ : accessed 30 August 2016).

“Lieut. David Shackford was buried on Friday,” The Newburyport Herald (Newburyport, Massachusetts), 9 September 1862, page 2, col 3; digital images, Newburyport Public Library (http://newburyport.advantage-preservation.com/ : accessed 30 August 2016).

Massachusetts, Massachusetts Deaths, 1841-1915, DEATHS REGISTERED IN THE City of Newburyport for the Year eighteen hundred and sixty-two page 256, David Shackford, 22 August 1862; digital images, Family Search (http://familysearch.org : accessed 10 January 2014).

Massachusetts, Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988, , Lydia C Short m David Shackford, 14 September 1849; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 5 September 2016); Town and City Clerks of Massachusetts. Massachusetts Vital and Town Records..

“Massachusetts, Town Clerk, Vital and Town Records, 1626-2001,” digital images, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 26 August 2016), David Shackford m Lydia Eva Short.

Nason George W., History And Complete Roster of the Massachusetts Regiments, Minute Men of 1861 Who Responded To the First Call of President Abraham Lincoln, April 15, 1861, To Defend the Flag And Constitution of the United State (Boston, Massachusetts: Smith & McCance, 1910), page 238; digital image, Google Books (http://books.google.com : accessed 23 May 2014.

Vital Records of Newburyport Massachusetts to the End of the Year 1849 Volume I. Births (Salem, Mass: The Essex Institute, 1911), page 347 and; digital images, Essex County Ma (http://essexcountyma.net/ : accessed 12 July 2014.

Copyright 2017 Joanne Shackford Parkes  (sharing a link to this post is appreciated but please do not copy this material and paste it elsewhere)

Follow Friday -Thanks to The Ancestor Hunt We Found an Article About David Shackford’s Death in Newburyport (Blog 357)

We’ve been following The Ancestor Hunt blog by Kenneth R Marks on and off. We turned it off during our recent genealogy trip to cut down on e-mails but are very glad that we turned back on his blog due to the recent article about 18 Historical Newspaper Digitization Projects and mentioned an article stating that the Newburyport Public Library had digitized numerous old newspapers.  We did a search of the newspapers and found 210 articles that mention Shackford including this article about the death of David Shackford.

David, the son of Susan Shackford (no husband named), was born August 15, 1826 in Newburyport, Massachusetts and married Lydia Short on Sept 14, 1849. He was a shoemaker and served with the Minute Men on April 15, 1861 and died by drowning on August 22, 1862 the day after being elected as a 2d Lieutenant.  He was buried in Old Town, Newburyport.

Children:

Sarah J Shackford (1850-1933) – school teacher, bookkeeper, married John Holker then Edward M Hobson

Emily Corless Shackford (1854-1885)

Charles Henry Shackford (1857-1928)

Mary Ann Shackford (1859-1869)

Everett Archer Shackford (1862-1865)

Note:  We’re not sure who his mother descended from – possibly she was a daughter of Levi Shackford – not sure yet.

David A Shackford - The body of Lieut Shackford,,Newburyport Herald (Newburyport, Massachusetts), 8 August 1862.JPG
The Daily Herald, 5 Sept 1862

The body of Lieut. Shackford, who was drowned
on the 22d ult., was recovered on Thursday morning
Mr. Edward Dole, who had gone to the meadows, dis-
scovered the body some ten feet above low water mark,
and immediately returned with the information, when
several of the friends of the deceased went to the spot,
and taking charge of it brought it to the city. Its con-
dition renders interment immediate; and we learn that
arrangements are in progress, and that the funeral will
take place from the Purchase street church this fore-
noon, at 10’o’clock. The services will be conducted
by the pastor, Rev. Mr. Butler.
The other clergymen of the city are invited and no
doubt will by present. We learn also that the City
Government, the Veteran Artillery Association , the
Cushing Guard, Mr. Stone’s Company and the sever-
al engine companies of the city will probably be in
attendance.
The supposition was entertained by those present at
the time Lieut. Shackford so suddenly disappeared
from their view that he had been seized by a shark,
and we hear that circumstances are decisive on this
point.

All posts on this website are a work in progress.  We’d love to learn of any corrections or additions to the information shared.  Also we’d love it if  you’d like the post here or at http://www.facebook.com/shackfordgenealogy) as that helps share the post with others. Thanks!

SOURCES:

“The Body of Lieut Shackford,” The Daily Herald (Newburyport, Massachusetts), 5 September 1862; digital images, Newburyport Public Library (http://newburyport.advantage-preservation.com/ : accessed 26 August 2016).

“Card Records of Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans,” digital images, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 14 May 2015), David Shackford

Creasey George W., The City of Newburyport in the Civil War (Forgotten Books, 1903), page 75; digital images, Forgotten books (www.forgottenbooks.org : accessed 15 July 2014.

Massachusetts, Massachusetts Deaths, 1841-1915, DEATHS REGISTERED IN THE City of Newburyport for the Year eighteen hundred and sixty-two page 256, David Shackford, 22 August 1862; digital images, Family Search (http://familysearch.org : accessed 10 January 2014).

Nason George W., History And Complete Roster of the Massachusetts Regiments, Minute Men of 1861 Who Responded To the First Call of President Abraham Lincoln, April 15, 1861, To Defend the Flag And Constitution of the United State (Boston, Massachusetts: Smith & McCance, 1910), page 238; digital image, Google Books (http://books.google.com : accessed 23 May 2014.

Vital Records of Newburyport Massachusetts to the End of the Year 1849 Volume I. Births (Salem, Mass: The Essex Institute, 1911), page 347 and; digital images, Essex County Ma (http://essexcountyma.net/ : accessed 12 July 2014.

Updated Aug 30, 2016 – removed the middle initial A.  (We’d reviewed every source we’d found pertaining to David Shackford and do not find any reference to a middle initial or middle name and are uncertain why we added a middle initial.)

Copyright 2017 Joanne Shackford Parkes  (sharing a link to this post is appreciated but please do not copy this material and paste it elsewhere)